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Authentication of eggs and egg products

  • P. Brereton

Abstract

Egg quality has traditionally been seen as either a food safety issue or a concern of industry. Until recently, there has been less emphasis on ensuring egg quality from a regulatory perspective. However, the egg industry produces annually in excess of 500 000 billion eggs throughout the world. In addition, consumers have become more discerning and seek a ‘superior’ and well-defined product. Therefore, it is easy to see that financial pressures and incentives may be placed on egg producers. The authenticity of egg products may thus be questioned as opportunities for adulteration may exist to provide the advantages of commercial gain to unscrupulous producers, processors and retailers.

Keywords

European Union Succinic Acid British Standard Microbiological Examination British Standard Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Brereton

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