Advertisement

Temperature modelling and relationships in fish transportation

  • C. Alasalvar
  • P. C. Quantick

Abstract

Throughout the world there is a high demand for fresh and processed fish which has led to efforts by many fishing industries and processors to improve the transportation and supply of a high-quality product to consumers.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Coefficient Fresh Fish National Marine Fishery Service Surface Heat Transfer Coefficient Smoke Salmon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alasalvar, C. (1994), Factors affecting the safety and quality offish during chill distribution. PhD Thesis, University of Humberside, School of Applied Science and Technology, Grimsby, U.K.Google Scholar
  2. Alasalvar, C. and Nesvadba, P. (1994), Measurement of thermal conductivity and density of expanded polystyrene. Torry Document No. 2612 (Internal document), MAFF, Food Science Laboratory, Torry, Aberdeen, UK.Google Scholar
  3. Alasalvar, C. and Nesvadba, P. (1995), Time/temperature profiles of smoked salmon packaged with cooling gel and shipped at ambient temperature. J. Food Sci. 60(3), 619–621, 626.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Anon. (1995), Food MicroModel. The World of Ingredients. Jan/Feb., 57.Google Scholar
  5. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Condition Engineers, Inc.) (1981), ASH RAE Handbook of 1981 Fundamentals. ASHRAE, Atlanta, Georgia.Google Scholar
  6. ATP (Agrément de Transport de Périssables) (1987), Consolidated text of the agreement on the international carriage of perishable foodstuffs and on special equipment to be used for such carriage. In Command No. 25, November 1987, HMSO, London.Google Scholar
  7. Avdalov, N. and Ripoll, A. (1981), Handling, quality and yield of fresh hake. Refrig. Sci. Technol. 49(4), 71–78.Google Scholar
  8. Bennour, M., Marrakchi, A.EL., Bouchriti, N., Hamama, A. and Quadaa, M.EL. (1991), Chemical and microbiological assessments of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) stored in ice. J. Food Prot. 54(10), 784–792.Google Scholar
  9. Bilinski, E., Jonas, R.E.E. and Peters, M.D. (1983), Factors controlling the deterioration of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) during iced storage. J. Food Sci. 48(3), 808–812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Boeri, R.L., Davidovich, L.A., Giannini, D.H. and Lupin, H.M. (1985), Method to estimate the consumption of ice during fish storage. Intl. J. Refrig. 8(2), 97–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Børresen, T. and Strøm, T. (1983), Fish processing. In Chemistry and World Food Supplies: The New Frontiers, Shemilt, L.W. (Ed.), Chemrawn II, Pergamon Press, Oxford, pp. 411–419.Google Scholar
  12. Boyd, N.S. and Wilson, N.D.C. (1977), Hypoxanthine concentrations as an indicator of freshness of iced snapper. New Zealand Journal of Science 20(2), 139–143.Google Scholar
  13. Bryan, F.L. (1992), Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Evaluations. World Health organization, Geneva.Google Scholar
  14. BSI (British Standard Institution) 874. (1986), British Standard Methods for Determining Insulating Properties-Part 2: Test for the Thermal Conductivity and Related Properties, Section 2.1, Guarded Hot-Plate Method, BS 874. British Standard Institution, London.Google Scholar
  15. Charm, S.E., Learson, R.J., Ronsivalli, L.J. and Schwartz, M. (1972), Organoleptic technique predicts refrigeration shelf life of fish. J. Food Technol. 26(7), 65–68.Google Scholar
  16. Chattopadhyay, P., Raychaudhuri, B.C. and Rose, A.N. (1975), Prediction of temperature of iced fish. J. Food Sci. 40(5), 1080–1084.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Cole, M.B. (1991), Databases in modern food microbiology. Trends Food Sci. Tech. 1, 293–297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Connell, J.J. (1990), Control of Fish Quality, 3rd edn. Fishing News Books, Farnham.Google Scholar
  19. Cox, K. (1982), Capabilities of airfreight containers. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 280–286.Google Scholar
  20. Dept of Health, UK (1990), Guidelines on the Food Hygiene (Amendment) Regulations 1990. Department of Health, London.Google Scholar
  21. Dept of Transport (1988), A Guide to the International Transport of Perishable Foods. Department of Transport, Publications Sales Unit, Building 1, Victoria Road, South Ruislip, Middlesex, HA4 ONE, U.K.Google Scholar
  22. EC (1989), Council directive amending directive 79/112/EEC on the labelling of foodstuffs, 89/395/EEC. Official Journal of the European Communities 32(L 186), 17–20.Google Scholar
  23. EC (1990) Proposal for a council regulation laying down health conditions for the production and placing on the market of fishery products. Official Journal of the European Communities 33 (C 84), 58–70.Google Scholar
  24. Evans, T. (1995), Seafood safety - what exporters must know about HACCP. Infofish International 3 (May/Jun.), 48–52.Google Scholar
  25. FAO (1992), Ice in fisheries. In FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 331, Graham, J., Johston, W.A. and Nicholson, F.J. (Eds), FAO Publications, Rome.Google Scholar
  26. FAO (1994), FAO/DANIDA Training Project on Fish Technology and Quality Control: FAO Fish Utilisation and Marketing Service No. 15. FAO, Rome.Google Scholar
  27. Fernandez-Salguero, J. and Mackie, I.M. (1987), Comparative rates of spoilage of fillets and whole fish during storage of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) and herring (Clupea harengus) as determined by the formation of non-volatile and volatile amines. Int. J. Food Sci. Technol. 22(4), 385–390.Google Scholar
  28. Gibson, D.M. (1985), Predicting the shelf life of packaged fish from conductance measurements. J. Appl Bacteriol. 58(5), 465–470.Google Scholar
  29. Gould, G. (1989), Predictive mathematical modelling of microbial growth and survival in foods. Food Sci. Technol. Today 3(2), 89–92.Google Scholar
  30. Hall, P.A. (1994), Scope for rapid microbiological methods in modern food production. In Rapid Analysis Techniques in Food Microbiology, Patel, P.D. (Ed.), Blackie, London, pp. 254–267.Google Scholar
  31. Harris, R.W. (1982), Use of gel refrigerants in seafood packaging and shipping. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 139–146.Google Scholar
  32. Heap, R.D. (1992), Refrigeration of chilled foods. In Chilled Foods: A Comprehensive Guide, Dennis, C. and Stringer, M. (Eds), Ellis Horwood, Chichester, pp. 59–76.Google Scholar
  33. Huss, H.H. (1992), Development and use of the HACCP concept in fish processing. In Quality Assurance in the Fish Industry, Huss, H.H. et al. (Eds), Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, pp. 489–500.Google Scholar
  34. ICMSF (1988), Microorganisms in Foods 4 - Application of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) System to Ensure Microbiological Safety and Quality. Blackwell Scientific, Oxford.Google Scholar
  35. Jay, J.M. (1992), Modern Food Microbiology, 4th edn. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.Google Scholar
  36. Jørgensen, B.R., Gibson, D.M. and Huss, H.H. (1988), Microbiological quality and shelf life prediction of chilled fish. Intl. J. Food Microbiol 6(4), 295–307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Leu, S.S., Jhaveri, S.N., Karakoltsidis, P.A. and Constantininides, S.M. (1981), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus, L): Seasonal variations in the proximate composition and distribution of chemical nutrients. J. Food Sci. 46(6), 1635–1638.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Lima dos Santos, C.A., Josupeit, H. and Chimisso dos Santos, D. (1994), EEC quality and health requirements and seafood exports from developing countries. Infofish International 1 (Jan/Feb.), 21–26.Google Scholar
  39. Lupin, H.M. (1985), Measuring effectiveness of insulated containers. In FAO Fisheries Report No. 329 Supplement, Proceedings of the FAO Expert Consultation on Fish Technology in Africa, Lusaka, Zambia, 21–25 January, 1985, FAO Publications, Rome, pp. 36–46.Google Scholar
  40. Lupin, H.M., Giannini, D.H., Soule, C.L., Davidovic, L.A. and Boeri, L. (1980), Storage life of chilled Patagonian hake (Merluccius hubbsi). J. Food Technol. 15(3), 285–300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. MAFF (1991), The Microbiological Status of Some Mail Order Foods. Food Safety Directorate, MAFF Publications, London.Google Scholar
  42. MAFF (1994), Software marketed by Food Micromodel Ltd., Randalls Road, Leatherland, UK.Google Scholar
  43. Maia, E.L., Rodrigurez-Amaya, D.B. and Moraes, M.A.C. (1983), Sensory and chemical evaluation of the keeping quality of the Brazilian fresh-water fish (Prochilodus scrofa) in ice storage. J. Food Sci. 48(4), 1075–1077.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Makene, J. and Mgawe, Y. (1991), Insulation for local insulated containers. In FAO Fisheries Report No. 467 Supplement, Proceedings of the FAO Expert Consulation Fish Technology in Africa, Accra, Ghana, 22–25 October, 1991, FAO Publications, Rome, pp. 38–42.Google Scholar
  45. Makene, J., Mgawe, Y. and Mlay, M.L. (1988), Construction and testing of the mbegani fish container. In FAO Fisheries Report No. 400 Supplement, Proceedings of the FAO Expert Consulation on Fish Technology in Africa, Abidjan, Cote d’lvoire, 25–28 April, 1988, FAO Publications, Rome, pp. 1–7.Google Scholar
  46. Matches, J.R. (1982), Microbial changes in packages. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 46–70.Google Scholar
  47. McDonald, I. and Graham, J. (1985), Variations in potential shelf-life resulting from boxing at sea practice. In Storage Lives of Chilled and Frozen Fish and Fish Products, I.I.F.-I.I.R. Commissions C2 and C3-1985–84, Aberdeen, UK, pp. 275–280.Google Scholar
  48. McDonald, I. and Nesvadba, P. (1988), Measurement of thermal conductance of high density (HD) polyethylene fish box material and the ice meltage in stowage. Torry Document No. 2251 (Internal document), MAFF, Food Science Laboratory, Torry, Aberdeen, UK.Google Scholar
  49. Mignault, R. (1982), Use of airfright forwarders and freight. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 276–279.Google Scholar
  50. Morita, R.Y. (1973), Psychrophilic bacteria. Bacteriol. Rev. 39(2), 144–167.Google Scholar
  51. Mortimore, S. and Wallace, C. (1994), HACCP, A Practical Approach. Chapman & Hall, London.Google Scholar
  52. Myers, M. (1981), Planning and engineering data 1: Fresh fish handling. In FAO Fisheries Circulate No. 735, FAO Publications, Rome, p. 64.Google Scholar
  53. National Marine Fisheries Service (1987), Plan of Operations-Model Seafood Surveillance Project. Office of Trade and Industry Service, National Seafood Inspection Laboratory, PO Drawer 1207, Pascagoula, MS 39568–1207.Google Scholar
  54. Olley, J. (1978), Current status of the theory of the application of temperature indicators, temperature integrators and temperature function integrators to the food spoilage chain. Int. J. Refrig. 1(2), 81–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Olley, J. and Ratkowsky, D.A. (1973), The role of temperature function integration in the monitoring offish spoilage. Food Technology in New Zealand 8(2), 15–17.Google Scholar
  56. Olley, J. and Quarmby, A.R. (1981), Spoilage of fish from Hong Kong at different storage temperatures; Prediction of storage life at higher temperatures based on storage behaviour at 0°C, and a simple visual technique for comparing taste panel and objective assessment of deterioration. Tropical Science 23(2), 147–153.Google Scholar
  57. Owen, D. and Nesbitt, M. (1984), A versatile time temperature function integrator. Laboratory Practice 33(1), 70–75.Google Scholar
  58. Ratkowsky, D.A., Olley, J., McMeekin, T.A. and Ball, A. (1982), Relationship between temperature and growth rate of bacterial cultures. J. Bacteriol. 149(1), 1–5.Google Scholar
  59. Ratkowsky, D.A., Lowry, R.K., McMeekin, T.A., Stokes, A.N., Chandler, R.E. (1983), Model for bacterial culture growth rate throughout the entire biokinetic temperature range. J. Bacteriol. 154(3), 1222–1226.Google Scholar
  60. Regenstein, J.M. and Regenstein, C.E. (1991), Introduction to Fish Technology. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.Google Scholar
  61. Roberts, T.A. (1990), Predictive modelling of microbial growth. In Food Technology International Europe, Turner, A. (Ed.), Sterling Publications International, London, pp. 231–235.Google Scholar
  62. Rogers, W.F. (1982), Insulated containers for shipping perishables. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 243–248.Google Scholar
  63. Ronsivalli, L.J. and Baker, D.W. (1981), Low temperature preservation of seafoods: A review. Marine Fisheries Review 43(4), 1–15.Google Scholar
  64. Ronsivalli, L.J. and Charm, S.E. (1975), Spoilage and shelf life prediction of refrigerated fish. Marine Fisheries Review 37(4), 32–34.Google Scholar
  65. Siebel, J.E. (1982), Specific heat of various products. Ice and Refrigeration 2, 256–257.Google Scholar
  66. Smith, J.G.R., Hardy, R. and Young, K.W. (1980), A seasonal study of the storage characteristics of mackerel stored at chill and ambient temperatures. In Advances of Fish Science and Technology, Connell, J.J. and Torry Research Station (Eds), Fishing News Books, Farnham, pp. 372–378.Google Scholar
  67. Spencer, R. and Baines, C.R. (1964), The effect of temperature on the spoilage of wet white fish. Food Technology 18(5), 769–773.Google Scholar
  68. Storey, R.M. (1985), Time temperature function integration, its relationship and application to chilled fish. In Storage Lives of Chilled and Frozen Fish and Fish Products, I.I.F.-I.I.R. Commissions C2 and C3-1985–84, Aberdeen, UK, pp. 293–297.Google Scholar
  69. Taylor, M.R. (1993), FDA’s plan for food safety and HACCP - institutionalising a philosophy of prevention. Presented at Symposium on Foodborne Microbiological Pathogens, International Life Sciences Institute in Conjunction with the International Association of Milk, Food and Environmental Sanitarians National Meetings, Atlanta.Google Scholar
  70. Turner, A. (1992), Legislation. In Chilled Foods - A Comprehensive Guide, Dennis, C. and Stringer, M. (Eds), Ellis Horwood, Chichester, pp. 39–57.Google Scholar
  71. UK (1990), Food Hygiene (Amendment) Regulations 1990, (SI 1990 No. 1431). HMSO, London.Google Scholar
  72. US FDA (1992), Specification for Non-hazardous Materials 29 CFR, 1910–1200. Food and Drug Administration, USA.Google Scholar
  73. US FDA (1994), Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point Regulations, January. Food and Drug Administration, USA.Google Scholar
  74. Walker, S.J. (1992), Chilled foods microbiology. In Chilled Foods-A Comprehensive Guide, Dennis, C. and Stringer, M. (Eds), Ellis Horwood, Chichester, pp. 165–195.Google Scholar
  75. Walker, S.J. and Stringer, M.F. (1990), Microbiology of chilled foods. In Chilled Foods-The State of the Art, Gormley, T.R. (Ed.), Elsevier Applied Science, Barking, pp. 269–304.Google Scholar
  76. Williams, A.P., Blackburn, C. de W. and Gibbs, P. A. (1992), Advances in the use of predictive techniques to improve the safety and extend the shelf-life of foods. Food Sci. Technol. Today 6(3), 148–151.Google Scholar
  77. Wills, L.A. (1982), Facilitating seafood marketing through modern transportation methods. In Proceedings of the First International Conference on Seafood Packaging and Shipping, Martin, R.E. (Ed.), Science & Technology National Fisheries Institute, Washington, DC, pp. 11–22.Google Scholar
  78. Woolfe, M.L. (1992), Temperature monitoring and measurement. In Chilled Foods-A Comprehensive Guide, Dennis, C. and Stringer, M. (Eds), Ellis Horwood, Chichester, pp. 77–109.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Alasalvar
  • P. C. Quantick

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations