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Alkylating and Platinating Agents

  • Stanton L. Gerson

Abstract

Alkylating agents form the backbone of many anticancer regimens and are used in both conventional and high-dose therapy settings. The biologic and chemical activities of the nitrogen mustards were studied extensively between the World Wars. Because of their vesicant activity on the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract, the mustards also were studied for their effects on lymphosarcomas in mice during World War II. This led to the start of clinical studies, in 1942, and kicked off the era of modern cancer chemotherapy [1].

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Absolute Neutrophil Count Alkylating Agent Testicular Cancer Polycythemia Vera 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanton L. Gerson

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