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Proteases II pp 481-484 | Cite as

Neutrophil Elastase, Thrombin and Plasmin in Septic Shock

  • R. Seitz
  • M. Wolf
  • R. Egbring
  • K. Havemann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 240)

Abstract

In septic shock both bleeding and clotting may occur: a hemorrhagic diathesis due to a lack of coagulation factors as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) leading to impaired organ perfusion. Proteolytic systems appear to be involved in both the enhanced turnover of hemostatic proteins and the damage of microcirculation. The classical concept of DIC implicates the action of thrombin and plasmin, the key enzymes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, resprectively. In the past decade evidence has been accumulated1,2 that neutral proteases from neutrophil granulocytes may contribute to the above mentioned complications, and thus influence the prognosis of septic shock. The appearance of active proteases in the plasma is immediately followed by the formation of complexes with their specific inhibitors. Such proteinase-inhibitor complexes (PIC) were determined in 43 patients with septic shock.

Keywords

Septic Shock Disseminate Intravascular Coagulation Disseminate Intravascular Coagulation Neutrophil Elastase Septic Shock Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Seitz
    • 1
  • M. Wolf
    • 1
  • R. Egbring
    • 1
  • K. Havemann
    • 1
  1. 1.Div. of Internal Medicine/Dept. of Hematology/OncologyMarburgWest Germany

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