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Alternative Approaches to Change

  • Christopher Baldry
Part of the Approaches to Information Technology book series (AIT)

Abstract

In international comparisons of levels of industrial conflict and “strike- proneness,” Britain usually appears towards the middle, displaying neither the high propensity for strikes of the Italians nor the very low levels of the Swedes. However, during problem periods in British industrial relations, it is not surprising that British management have often looked at other nations with envy and attempted to discern a key ingredient in their industrial relations systems that could be adapted to the British context and contribute to a more harmonious relationship between managers and employees.

Keywords

Trade Union Collective Bargaining Industrial Relation Work Council Industrial Democracy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Baldry
    • 1
  1. 1.University of StrathclydeGlasgowScotland

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