Mitogenic Effect of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) on Lymphoblastoid Cells Involved HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

  • Gilles Favre
  • Christine Gouzy
  • Evelyne Blancy
  • Jean-Claude Dousset
  • Georges Soula
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 150)

Abstract

Preliminary data (1) have demonstrate that B-lymphocytes transformed by Epstein-Barr virus maintened with LPDS require the presence of lipoproteins in order to proliferate optimaly. Of the two classes of lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) that have been studied, HDL seems to be the major factor involved in the proliferation of the lymphoblastoid cells (LC). This is mostly due to the lack of toxicity when added at high concentration (however at high HDL concentration it presents low stimulating effect), the non-dependence on plasma to exhibited its mitogenic effect, the role played by total HDL apoproteins. Mitogenic effect is also realize in other cells type as bovine vascular endothelial cells, corneal endothelial cells (2, 3).

Keywords

Cholesterol Toxicity Petroleum Penicillin Glutamine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    G. Favre, E. Blancy, J.F. Tournier and G. Soula, Effect of lipoproteins on lymphoblastoid cells proliferation: mitogenic effect on high density lipoproteins (HDL), Biochim. Biophys. Acta, submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.P Tauber, J. Cheng and D. Gospodarowicz, Effect of high and low density lipoproteins on proliferation of cultured bovine vascular endothelial cells, J. Clin. Invest.. 66: 696–708 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    D.C. Cohen, S.L. Massoglia and D. Gospodarowicz, Correlation between two effects of high density lipoproteins on vascular endothelial cells, J. Biol. Chem.. 257: 9429–9437 (1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    V. Quesney-Huneeus, H.A. Galick and M.V. Siperstein, The dual role of mevalonate in the cell cycle, J. Biol. Chem.. 258: 378–385 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M.D. Siperstein. Role of cholesterogenesis and isoprenoid synthesis in DNA replication and cell growth, J. Lipid Res.. 25: 1462–1468 (1984).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    R.J. Havel, M.A. Eder and J.H. Bragdon. The distribution and chemical composition of ultracentrifugally separated lipoproteins in human serum, J. Clin. Invest.. 34: 1345–1350 (1955).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. Folch, M. Lees and G.N. Sloane Stanley. A simple method for the isolation and purification of total lipids from animal tissues, J. Biol. Chem.. 226: 497–509 (1957).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    A.I. Leikin, M. Mihovilovic and A.M. Scanu. High-density lipoproteins influence cholesterol homeostasis in cultured virus-transformed human lympho-Mastoid cells, J. Biol. Chem., 257: 14280–14287 (1982).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Brown and J. Goldstein, Multivalent feedback regulation of HMG-C o A reductase a control mechanism coordinating isoprenoid synthesis and cell growth, J. Lipid Res.. 21: 505–517 (1980).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilles Favre
    • 1
  • Christine Gouzy
    • 2
  • Evelyne Blancy
    • 1
  • Jean-Claude Dousset
    • 2
  • Georges Soula
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Groupe de Recherche du Centre Claudius-RegaudToulouseFrance
  2. 2.Faculté Sciences PharmaceutiquesLaboratoire de BiochimieToulouseFrance

Personalised recommendations