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A Study of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria from a Thermal Sulfur Spring

  • N. J. Khinvasara

Abstract

The green photosynthetic bacteria are a physiological-ecological group of anaerobic phototrophic bacteria with anoxygenic photosynthesis (Pfennig and Trüper, 1961). The most important environmental factors affecting the growth of these organisms are anaerobic conditions, the presence of hydrogen sulfide, and illumination. The green photosynthetic bacteria have a wide ecological distribution ranging from freshwater habitats such as ponds, ditches, stagnant bodies of water, lakes, etc.; marine and saline habitats such as seawater pools, salt marshes, closed bays and estuaries and thermal habitats such as sulfur springs. Extensive reviews have appeared in the literature on the distribution of green sulfur bacteria in nature (Kondratieva, 1965; Gorlenko et al., 1977).

Keywords

Salt Marsh Photosynthetic Bacterium Green Sulfur Bacterium Purple Sulfur Bacterium Thermal Habitat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. J. Khinvasara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyMACS Research InstitutePuneIndia

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