Feeding Disorders in the Developmentally Disabled Population

  • Amy J. Ginsberg

Abstract

Consistent with the growing focus on health promotion, eating and other food-related problems have received increased attention in the behavioral medicine literature. Experimental investigations have spanned a continuum of eating problems from eating excesses, such as obesity and bulimia, to eating deficits, such as anorexia nervosa and nonorganic failure-to-thrive. More recently, researchers have attended to the treatment of organic feeding problems that may be associated with a chronic medical illness (such as short gut syndrome) or produced iatrogenically secondary to medical treatment (e.g., Ginsberg & Klonoff, 1985).

Keywords

Obesity Toxicity Depression Anemia Dehydration 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amy J. Ginsberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavior Therapy Clinic, Department of PsychiatryCase Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University HospitalsClevelandUSA

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