Autism

A Case in Early Childhood
  • Sandra L. Harris
  • Jan S. Handleman

Abstract

Infantile autism is a pervasively handicapping developmental disorder that begins in the child’s earliest months and often lasts a lifetime. According to the criteria of the American Psychiatric Association (1980), the essential diagnostic features for this disorder include onset before 30 months of age; a pervasive lack of response to others; gross deficits in language, with peculiar speech patterns in those youngsters who do speak; and bizarre responses to the environment, including resistance to change. These children do not exhibit the signs of thought disorder found in schizophrenia.

Keywords

Clay Income Schizophrenia 

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References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra L. Harris
    • 1
  • Jan S. Handleman
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate School of Applied and Professional PsychologyRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.Douglass Developmental Disabilities CenterDouglass CollegeNew BrunswickUSA

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