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Attention Deficit Disorder and Hyperactivity

Pharmacotherapies
  • Kenneth D. Gadow
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series

Abstract

Even though there is an extensive literature about the behavioral effects of psychotropic drugs on hyperactive children, there has been very little research into the effects of specific treatment procedures on therapeutic response and outcome. Numerous “how-to-treat” publications may be found (e.g., Arnold, 1973; Barkley, 1981; Cantwell, 1980; Eisenberg, 1972; Gittelman, 1983; Gross & Wilson, 1974; Katz, Saraf, Gittelman-Klein, & Klein, 1975; Laufer, Denhoff, & Riverside, 1957; Millichap, 1973; Ottinger, Halpin, Miller, Demian, & Hannemann, 1985; Rapoport, 1980; Safer & Allen, 1976; Solomons, 1968, 1971, 1973; Winsberg, Yepes, & Bialer, 1976), but they are based, for the most part, on the author’s clinical experience of and/or research into the behavioral effects of psychotropic drugs. Although the literature reveals many differences of opinion about how various treatment situations should be handled, there is general agreement that pharmacotherapy should be carefully monitored and that care providers are an important source of information about the child’s response to medication. Nevertheless, data from investigations of “how others have been treated” suggest that there is a marked disparity between the treatment procedures recommended in professional journals and those used in real-world settings (e.g., Brulle, Barton, & Foskett, 1983; Gadow, 1982, 1983; Loney & Ordoña, 1975; Ross, 1979; Sindelar & Meisel, 1982; Solomons, 1973; Weithorn & Ross, 1975).

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth D. Gadow
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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