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Fears and Phobias

  • Richard J. Morris
  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
  • Kay Aldridge

Abstract

Fear is an intense emotion that is associated with cognitive, behavioral, and/or physiological components of anxiety (Morris & Kratochwill, 1983). In the presence of danger, fear can lead an individual to take protective action, and cause the person to behave in a cautious manner (Jersild, 1968). In school-age children transitory fears are common. These fears, which do not typically interfere with the child’s daily functioning, are often viewed as integrally tied to normal child development (e.g., Jersild, 1968; Jersild & Holmes, 1935; Morris & Kratochwill, 1983; Smith, 1979).

Keywords

Test Anxiety Behavioral Assessment Apply Behavior Analysis Selective Mutism Separation Anxiety Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard J. Morris
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
    • 2
  • Kay Aldridge
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology, School Psychology ProgramUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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