Behaviorally Based Group Homes for Juvenile Offenders

  • Curtis J. Braukmann
  • Montrose M. Wolf

Abstract

Perhaps the most systematic, and certainly the most long-lived and widely disseminated, application of the behavioral approach with juvenile offenders has been in the context of group homes. Research and development based on behavioral principles and procedures began at the University of Kansas in the late 1960s and continues to the present to establish and refine an effective, consumer-preferred, and replicable group home treatment model. Because that model—the Achievement Place or Teaching-Family model (Wolf, Phillips, & Fixsen, 1972)—has been the focal point of almost all of the behavioral research and development concerning group homes, this chapter will concentrate on that model. Following a summary of the results of evaluation research on the Teaching-Family approach, the chapter concludes with a discussion of how evaluation results have prompted major reconsideration of the original assumptions of the approach.

Keywords

Covariance Peri Sonal Univer 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Curtis J. Braukmann
    • 1
  • Montrose M. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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