Dynamic but Structural Equation Modeling of Repeated Measures Data

  • J. J. McArdle
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

The term “dynamic” is broadly defined as a pattern of change. Many scientists have searched for dynamics by calculating df/dt: the ratio of changes or differences d in a function f relative to changes in time t.This simple dynamic equation was used in the 16th and 17th century motion experiments of Galileo, in the 17th and 18th century gravitation experiments of Newton, and in the 19th century experiments of many physicists and chemists (see Morris, 1985). I also use this dynamic equation, but here I examine multivariate psychological change data using the 20th century developments of latent variable structural equation modeling.

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© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. J. McArdle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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