Adaptations for Aquatic Living by Carnivores

  • James A. Estes
Chapter

Abstract

Before considering the carnivores’ adaptations for aquatic living, one must define what is meant by an “adaptation” as well as identify those species that are aquatic. Neither task is simple.

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© Cornell University 1989

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  • James A. Estes

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