Guidelines for effective school health education to prevent the spread of AIDS

  • Pascal James ImperatoJr

Abstract

Since the first cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were reported in the United States in 1981, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS and other HIV -related diseases has precipitated an epidemic unprecedented in modern history. Because the virus is transmitted almost exclusively by behavior that individuals can modify, educational programs to influence relevant behavior can be effective in preventing the spread of HIV.1–5

Keywords

Pneumonia Cocaine Sarcoma Assure Dition 

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Copyright information

© Medical Society of the State of New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pascal James ImperatoJr
    • 1
  1. 1.The Medical Society of the State of New YorkLake SuccessUSA

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