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Human Oligodendrocytes in Culture: Biology and Immunology

  • Seung U. Kim

Abstract

In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes (OL) are responsible for the formation and maintenance of myelin which facilitates saltatory conduction of nervous impulses along axons. Abnormality and loss of OL and myelin result in several neurological disorders in human, among them multiple sclerosis (MS) for which there is no effective treatment (37, 40, 41). To better understand the pathogenesis of these disorders, it would be helpful if an enriched OL population could be isolated, grown in culture, and the basic properties of these cells studied in a controlled environment.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Major Histocompatibility Complex Myelin Basic Protein Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Myelin Associate Glycoprotein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seung U. Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of NeurologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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