Endemic Cretinism. An Overview

  • François M. Delange

Abstract

The term endemic cretinism applies to individuals born and living in areas of severe iodine deficiency and endemic goiter exhibiting irreversible anomalies of intellectual and physical development not explained by other causes than the environmental factors responsible for goiter. The prevalence of the disorder can reach 10% of the whole population in severely affected areas and cretinism constitutes the most serious complication of endemic goiter.

Keywords

Nickel Europe Manganese Iodine Selenium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • François M. Delange
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Depts. of Pediatrics and RadioisotopesUniversity Hospital Saint-Pierre, University of BrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Dept. of radioisotopes Hôpital Saint-Pierre 322BrusselesBelgium

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