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Notes on Theory in Environment and Behavior Research

  • William H. Ittelson
Part of the Advances in Environment, Behavior, and Design book series (AEBD, volume 2)

Abstract

The need for theory is a recurring theme in the environment—behavior—design literature. The reason for this need is clear. It is through theories that we make order out of a range of phenomena that otherwise would be unconnected and unrelated. Theories, in other words, make intelligible a domain of phenomena.

Keywords

Scientific Theory Structural Theory Euclidean Geometry Behavior Setting Everyday Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Ittelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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