Treatment of Candidosis in AIDS Patients

  • G. Just
  • D. Steinheimer
  • M. Schnellbach
  • C. Böttinger
  • E. B. Helm
  • W. Stille

Abstract

Fungal infections are the most common manifestations of infections by facultative pathogens in AIDS. The clinical manifestations range from mild infections of the mucous membrane to life-threatening systemic mycoses which are difficult to control. Candida oropharyngitis and Candida esophagitis are the most common fungal infections (Glatt et al., 1988; Holmberg and Meyer, 1986). In the latest CDC definition of AIDS, candidiasis of the esophagus, trachea, bronchi and lungs are indicative of AIDS in case of absence of serological evidence of HIV. In case of positive HIV serology, Candida infections of the esophagus indicate AIDS (CDC, 1987). The colonisation of the mucous membrane with Candida largely depends on the immune function and can be an early hint for HIV infection (Brodt et al., 1986; Klein et al., 1984). With the progression of T-cell defect, long-term or intermittent antimycotic therapy becomes necessary — even more so in cases receiving antibiotics or cytostatics at the same time. The dissemination of Candida., e.g. into the lung, CNS or other organs, is quite rare and only seen in more advanced stages of AIDS (Holmberg and Meyer, 1986, Langford et al., 1988).

Keywords

Burning Pneumonia Aspergillus Candida Amphotericin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Just
    • 1
  • D. Steinheimer
    • 1
  • M. Schnellbach
    • 1
  • C. Böttinger
    • 1
  • E. B. Helm
    • 1
  • W. Stille
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Internal Medicine/InfectiologyFrankfurt University HospitalFrankfurt/M 70Germany

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