Quality of Life and Coping in Heart Transplant Recipients

  • Beth E. Meyerowitz
  • Jennifer Vasterling
  • Jan Muirhead
  • William Frist

Abstract

As the frequency of successful heart transplantations increases, there is a growing need for information about how recipients and their families can adjust successfully to the many ongoing medical and psychological demands that follow transplantation. Patients are asked to engage in a wide range of adherence behaviors, to remain vigilant daily to the possibilities of infection or rejection, and to change longstanding life styles and habits. Patients attempt to meet these challenges at the same time that they and their families strive to resume “normal” lives. It is likely that these competing demands can tax the coping resources of even the most well-adjusted patients.

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Abate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beth E. Meyerowitz
    • 1
  • Jennifer Vasterling
    • 1
  • Jan Muirhead
    • 1
  • William Frist
    • 1
  1. 1.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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