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Non-Invasive Biochemical Methods for Assessing Human Embryo Quality

  • H. J. Leese
  • D. K. Gardner
  • A. L. Gott
  • A. H. Handyside
  • K. Hardy
  • M. A. K. Hooper
  • A. J. Rutherford
  • R. M. L. Winston

Abstract

While human in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and Embryo Transfer techniques have helped overcome the problems of infertility in some thousands of couples, success rates remain disappointingly low. The major problem remains the embryo transfer stage where only a comparatively small proportion of embryos implant and are carried to term successfully. Embryos for transfer are assessed on the basis of their morphology and extent of development in culture. These methods are notoriously imprecise and there is a need for quantitative non-invasive assays of human embryo quality.

Keywords

Glucose Uptake Human Embryo Blastocyst Stage Preimplantation Embryo Noninvasive Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Leese
    • 1
  • D. K. Gardner
    • 1
  • A. L. Gott
    • 1
  • A. H. Handyside
    • 2
  • K. Hardy
    • 2
  • M. A. K. Hooper
    • 3
  • A. J. Rutherford
    • 2
  • R. M. L. Winston
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of YorkYorkUK
  2. 2.Institute of Obstetrics and GynaecologyRoyal Postgraduate Medical School Hammersmith HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Sheffield Fertility CentreSheffieldUK

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