Magnetic Refrigeration Using Flux Compression in Superconductors

  • U. E. Israelsson
  • D. M. Strayer
  • H. W. Jackson
  • D. Petrac
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 35)

Abstract

We are presently investigating the feasibility of using flux compression in high temperature superconductors (HTS) to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. To understand better the process of flux compression, we have performed measurements using both Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials. We shall describe the application of such a flux compressor to magnetic refrigeration. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in HTS materials as presently prepared are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications.

Keywords

Permeability Helium Bismuth Thallium Refrigeration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. E. Israelsson
    • 1
  • D. M. Strayer
    • 1
  • H. W. Jackson
    • 1
  • D. Petrac
    • 1
  1. 1.Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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