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Neuromagnetic Imaging of Synchronized MU Activity

  • L. Narici
  • G. Iori
  • I. Modena
  • G. L. Romani
  • G. Torrioli
  • R. Traversa
  • P. M. Rossini

Abstract

Sensory stimulation at certain frequencies was shown to elicit EEG and MEG (MagnetoEncephaloGraphic) responses persisting longer than one second after the stimulation. Such responses have been described as a consequence of a process of synchronization of bioelectrical spontaneous activities in the brain with a specific frequency content, but otherwise uncorrelated (Narici et a1 1987a).

Keywords

Median Nerve Stimulation Equivalent Current Dipole Field Spatial Distribution Short Latency Somatosensory Single Equivalent Current Dipole 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Narici
    • 1
  • G. Iori
    • 1
  • I. Modena
    • 1
  • G. L. Romani
    • 2
  • G. Torrioli
    • 3
  • R. Traversa
    • 4
  • P. M. Rossini
    • 4
  1. 1.Dipartimento di FisicaUniversità di Roma “Tor Vergata”Italy
  2. 2.Istituto di Fisica MedicaUniversità di ChietiItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Solid State ElectronicsCNRRomaItaly
  4. 4.Dipartimento di Sanità PubblicaUniversità di Roma “Tor Vergata”Italy

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