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Measurement of Magnetic Field near an Acute Surgical Injury on the Rabbit’s Thigh

  • Z. Trontelj
  • J. Pirnat
  • J. Lužnik
  • V. Jazbinšek
  • V. Valenčič
  • D. Križaj
  • L. Vodovnik
  • A. Jerčinović

Abstract

The relation between the injuries in skin, muscles and bones in humans or animals and the increased electrophysiological activity in the injured area is a subject of research since 19 th century1,2. However, it seems that this research has become especially acute (and necessary) in the last years with the accelerated use of external electric and magnetic fields in different clinical applications, like the promotion of healing of wounds or fractured bones. In order to understand the healing processes and the role which have the external electromagnetic fields during the process of healing it is necessary to explore at the beginning the inner electrophysiological processes which take place in the injured area. That means, we have to find out more about the sources of endogeneous electric activity in injured limbs. In last years several authors have measured electric potentials and currents, called endogeneous potentials and currents, which accompany injuries in skin muscels and bone3,4,5,6,4,8. There was also an attempt to detect injury currents magnetically.9

Keywords

Stratum Corneum Skin Layer Muscle Injury Magnetic Signal Injured Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Trontelj
    • 1
  • J. Pirnat
    • 1
  • J. Lužnik
    • 1
  • V. Jazbinšek
    • 1
  • V. Valenčič
    • 2
  • D. Križaj
    • 2
  • L. Vodovnik
    • 2
  • A. Jerčinović
    • 2
  1. 1.Physics Department and Institute of Mathematics, Physics and MechanicsUniversity E. Kardelj of LjubljanaLjubljanaYugoslavia
  2. 2.Faculty of Electrical and Computer EngineeringUniversity E. Kardelj of LjubljanaLjubljanaYugoslavia

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