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Substance Abuse

  • Gary W. Holden
  • Michael S. Moncher
  • Steven P. Schinke

Abstract

Illicit substance use rates among American youth are the highest in the industrialized world (Johnston, Bachman, & O’Malley, 1988). Consequently, and despite earnest attempts to combat substance use problems, tobacco, alcohol, and drug abuse continue to threaten the development and well-being of many young Americans. Early substance use in childhood and adolescence poses immediate problems academically, socially, and emotionally. Later unabated substance use in adulthood can lead to physical, mental health, financial, employment, and interpersonal problems.

Keywords

High School Senior Life Skill Social Learning Theory Adolescent Substance Substance Abuse Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary W. Holden
    • 1
  • Michael S. Moncher
    • 1
  • Steven P. Schinke
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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