Abstract

The opening chapter in an International Handbook of Behavior Modification and Therapy should place the late 1980s’ version of behavior modification/therapy in appropriate conceptual contexts—the history, philosophy, and sociology of science; the histories of psychology, clinical psychology, and psychiatry; the broader developments of behaviorism; and the intellectual, social, economic, and political developments of twentieth-century society. Of course, these various contexts are not independent of each other but are mutually interactive.

Keywords

Placebo Obesity Depression Transportation Schizophrenia 

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© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard Krasner
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Behavioral MedicineStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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