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Dietary Fiber pp 273-282 | Cite as

Dietary Factors in the Etiology of Gallstones

  • Kenneth W. Heaton

Abstract

In Western countries the vast majority of gallstones form within the gallbladder. They are asymptomatic in 70–80% of cases, causing trouble only when they pass (or get stuck trying to pass) through the cystic duct or the ampulla of Vater. The major component in 60–80% of gallstones is crystalline cholesterol monohydrate, but most stones contain calcium salts (especially carbonate, bilimbinate, phosphate, and palmitate), and these are sometimes the main or only component.

Keywords

Bile Acid Dietary Fiber Wheat Bran Gallstone Disease Deoxycholic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth W. Heaton
    • 1
  1. 1.University Department of Medicine, Bristol Royal InfirmaryBristolUK

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