Advertisement

Bioluminescent REC A Mutants of Rhizobium as Model Organisms in Risk Assessment Studies

  • W. Selbitschka
  • A. Pühler
  • R. Simon
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 63)

Abstract

A major concern about the deliberate release of genetically modified microorganisms (GEMMOs) is that the released organism exerts a potential disruptive effect on the biotic community of its target eco-system. Approaches which circumvent such a potential risk involve GEMMOs which are either genetically debilitated (Curtiss, 1988), or carry conditionally lethal genes (Molin et al., 1987; Bej et al., 1988; Contreras et al., 1991; Knudsen and Karlström, 1991). We propose the use of recA mutants of Rhizobium as hosts for use in genetic manipulations, since recA mutants show a reduced fitness (Selbitschka et al., 1991). Using newly developed recA integration vectors, bioluminescent recA mutants of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were constructed. We propose to consider such strains as ideal model organisms in risk assessment studies.

Keywords

Double Crossover Lethal Gene Root Nodule Bacterium Risk Assessment Study Single Crossover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bej, A. K., M. H. Perlin, and R. M. Atlas. (1988) Model suicide vector for containment of genetically engineered microorganisms. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:2472–2477.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Contreras, A., S. Molin, and J-L. Ramos. (1991) Conditional-suicide containment system for bacteria which mineralize aromatics. Appl: Environ. Microbiol. 57:1504–1508.Google Scholar
  3. Curtiss III R. (1988) Engineering organisms for safety: What is necessary? In: The release of genetically engineered micro-organisms. Sussman, M., C. H. Collins, F. A. S. Skinner, and D. E. Stewart-Tull. (eds.) Academic Press, 6–20.Google Scholar
  4. Knudsen, S. M., and O. H. Karlström. (1991) Development of efficient suicide mechanisms for biological containment of bacteria. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:85–92.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Molin, S., P. Klemm, L. K. Poulsen, H. Biehl, K. Gerdes, and P. Andersson. (1987) Conditional suicide system for containment of bacteria and plasmids. Bio Technology 5:1315–1318.Google Scholar
  6. Ried, J. L., and A. Collmer. (1987) An nptII-sacB-sacR cartridge for constructing directed, unmarked mutations in gram-negative bacteria by marker exchange-eviction mutagenesis. Gene 57:239–246.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Selbitschka, W., W. Arnold, U. B. Priefer, T. Rottschäfer, M. Schmidt, R. Simon and A. Pühler. (1991) Characterization of recA genes and recA mutants of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae. Mol. Gen. Genet. 229:86–95.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Simon, R., U. Priefer, and A. Pühler. (1983) A broad host range mobilization system for in vivo genetic engineering: Transposon mutagenesis in gram negative bacteria. Bio Technology 1:784–791.Google Scholar
  9. Vincent, J. M. (1970) A manual for the practical study of root nodule bacteria. (IBP Handbook 15) Blackwell Scientific Publications, Ltd., OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Selbitschka
    • 1
  • A. Pühler
    • 1
  • R. Simon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsUniversity of BielefeldBielefeld 1Germany

Personalised recommendations