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Water Conveyance Tunnels

  • David E. Westfall

Abstract

Water conveyance tunnels require special considerations regarding friction losses, drop shafts for vertical conveyance, air removal, control of infiltration and exfiltration, tunnel linings, lake taps and connections to live tunnels, and maintenance.

Keywords

Head Loss Hydraulic Jump Concrete Lining Tunnel System Plunge Pool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David E. Westfall
    • 1
  1. 1.Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc.USA

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