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African locust bean (Parkia filicoidea Welw.)

  • A. C. Uwaegbute
Chapter

Abstract

The African locust bean is a tree legume found all over West Africa, southeast Asia, and tropical South America. It is a medium-sized tree found in open savanna woodlands where it may stand as the only tree species in a location, and characterized by its fruits, which are elongated pods, 5–11 inches long, and found in clusters. The immature fruit is green, assuming a brown colour as it matures. The mature pod is made up of a husk which encloses a powdery yellow material in which are embedded dark brown seeds. Seeds comprise about 25.4% of the weight of the dry pod. The whole fruit contains on a dry matter basis 12.7% protein, 6.8% fat, 6.2% ash and 18% fibre. The mature seed contains about 30% digestible carbohydrates (starch and sugars), 30% protein, 20% fat, 9% crude fibre and 5% minerals. Not only is the fat content higher than in most grain legumes, it is made up predominantly of unsaturated fatty acids (54% of total fatty acids). The unsaturated fatty acids are linoleic acid (42.5% of total, oleic acid (8.8% of total) and palmitoleic acid (2.7% of total). The saturated fatty acids which contribute 46% of total fatty acids, comprise palmitic acid (31% of total), stearic acid (7.7% of total), arachidic acid (4.2% of total) and behenic acid (3.1% of total).

Keywords

Phytic Acid Arachidic Acid Behenic Acid Digestible Carbohydrate Isoleucine Leucine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© E. Nwokolo and J. Smartt 1996

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  • A. C. Uwaegbute

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