Structural Determination of Saponins from Mungbean Sprouts by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • M. R. Lee
  • J. S. Lee
  • J. C. Wang
  • G. R. Waller
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 405)

Abstract

Saponins are glycosides that commonly occur in higher plants. Saponins are classified into triterpene and steroid groups; the aglycone usually has an oleanane, ursane, or dammarane skeleton. The sugars encountered in saponins are hexoses (including glucose, galactose, mannose, and 6-deoxyhexoses), pentoses, uronic acids, or amino sugars. Sugars may be linked to the sapogenin at one or two glycosylation sites, giving corresponding monodesmosidic or bidesmosidic saponins, respectively.

Keywords

Glycoside Galactose Oleanane Mannose Saponin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. S. Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. C. Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. R. Waller
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryNational Chung Hsing UniversityTaichungTaiwan, R.O.C.
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment StationOklahoma State UniversityStillwaterUSA

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