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Peripheral Blood Precursor Cell Transplants Across a Major Histocompatibility Barrier in Rabbits

Positive Effect of a Higher Number of Precursor Cells?
  • A. Gratwohl
  • H. Baldomero
  • L. John
  • A. Tichelli
  • A. Filipowicz
  • C. Nissen
  • B. Speck

Abstract

Peripheral blood precursor cells (PBPC) are used with increasing frequency as a source for hematopoietic transplants and have mainly replaced autologous bone marrow transplants. First clinical and experimental reports document the feasibility of PBPC as a source for allogeneic transplants. Few data exist on optimal procedure and the ideal number of cells for the transplant. We have previously shown in rabbits that PBPC can be used for transplants even across a major histocompatibility barrier. We used this model to test whether the number of transplanted precursor cells would influence outcome of the graft. Adult outbred Red Burgundy rabbits were used as donors, New Zealand white rabbits of the opposite sex as recipients. One individual donor was taken for one individual recipient. Conditioning consisted of single dose total body irradiation of 10 Gy followed by a short course of cyclosporine to enhance engraftment. Donor animals were treated with recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor 10 μg/kg s.c. daily from day -2 until day + 10. PBPC were obtained from the artery of the donor animal by repetitive centrifugation of 3 X 40 ml heparinized blood on each day of donation, i.e. days 0, +2, +3, +6, +8 and +10 and infused without further manipulation. Eight animals were transplanted. Seven of 8 engrafted, and 6 died of GvHD and pneumonia between days 12 and 55 (median survival of all animals: 34days). One animal is alive > 120 days. tranplanted nucleated cells varied from 7.3 to 15.4 x 108/kg) and CFU-GM from 12.3 to 176 x 104/kg (median 42 x 104/kg). There is a trend for increased survival with raised numbers of CFU-GM, (r) = 0.716, p = 0.0704. These data confirm that allogeneic PBPCT can engraft across a major histocompatiblity barrier and suggest that a higher number of CFU-GM might be advantageous.

Keywords

Allogeneic Transplant Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant Donor Animal Hematopoietic Precursor Cell Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Gratwohl
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Baldomero
    • 1
  • L. John
    • 1
  • A. Tichelli
    • 1
  • A. Filipowicz
    • 1
  • C. Nissen
    • 1
  • B. Speck
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Hematology Department of ResearchKantonsspital BaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.Division of Hematology Department of Internal MedicineKantonsspital BaselBaselSwitzerland

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