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Design of the XRS Helium Insert

  • Susan R. Breon
  • Howard D. Branch
  • Garcia J. Blount
  • Michael L. Jackson
  • Robert F. Boyle
  • James G. Tuttle
Part of the A Cryogenic Engineering Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 41)

Abstract

The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument has gone through numerous iterations, first as an instrument on NASA’s Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), then on AXAF-S, and now scheduled to fly on the Japanese Astro-E satellite. The Astro-E XRS is a high precision x-ray spectrometer with better than 20 eV resolution for x-ray energies from 0.3 to 10 keV. The requirement to obtain a lifetime greater than two years within the weight constraints of Astro-E has presented quite a challenge in the design of the cryogenic system. The design of the superfluid helium insert is described, with emphasis on innovative approaches taken to meet the requirements.

Keywords

Stainless Steel Wire Superfluid Helium Cryogenic System Goddard Space Flight Center Suspended Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan R. Breon
    • 1
  • Howard D. Branch
    • 1
  • Garcia J. Blount
    • 2
  • Michael L. Jackson
    • 1
  • Robert F. Boyle
    • 1
  • James G. Tuttle
    • 3
  1. 1.Cryogenics, Propulsion, and Fluid Systems Branch, Code 713NASA/Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbeltUSA
  2. 2.Mechanical Engineering Branch, Code 722NASA/Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbeltUSA
  3. 3.Hughes STXLanhamUSA

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