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Experimental Investigation of Accidental Loss of Insulation Vacuum in an LHC Prototype Dipole Cryostat

  • Ph. Lebrun
  • B. Szeless
  • L. Tavian
  • L. R. Williams
Part of the A Cryogenic Engineering Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 41)

Abstract

A sudden loss of insulation vacuum in an accelerator cryomagnet system be it due to a helium leak from a cryogenic circuit or leak from atmosphere has consequences for the cold mass as well as for the vacuum enclosure. The vacuum enclosure for the LHC dipole cryostat is made of carbon steel to reduce costs and to provide magnetic shielding. In the case of a loss of insulation vacuum the vacuum enclosure will be cooled rapidly but must not reach temperatures low enough to cause embrittlement of the wall material.

Helium gas at room temperature was admitted into the insulation space of a modified prototype cryomagnet, the cold mass of which had been previously cooled to 80 K. The evolution of temperature with time of the cold mass and of the vacuum enclosure has been measured and the corresponding heat influx estimated from a simple model.

Keywords

Large Hadron Collider Platinum Resistance Thermometer Insulation Space Helium Leak Frost Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ph. Lebrun
    • 1
  • B. Szeless
    • 1
  • L. Tavian
    • 1
  • L. R. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Accelerator Technology DivisionCERNGeneva 23Switzerland

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