An Intelligent Framework for Geologic Modeling Applications

  • Lee Plansky
  • Keith Prisbey
  • Carl Glass
  • Lee Barron
Part of the Computer Applications in the Earth Sciences book series (CAES)

Abstract

This paper provides a framework that can be used for constructing system models, simulations, or actual devices - real time or otherwise. The framework constructs, in the limit, can be intelligent, adaptive, systems or devices with a common architecture that may be used in a variety of applications. Application examples are given from characterization and exploration. A representation is introduced that generalizes the concept of an artificial intelligent agent, or being. The organization for intelligent systems given in this paper may be applied to systems modeling or control in: waste characterization (buried, stored, or processed), site characterization and restoration, materials processing and handling, regulatory compliance monitoring, environmental monitoring, waste storage or repository modeling, site selection, and facility monitoring and control.

Keywords

Quartz Furnace Milling Sedimentology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Plansky
    • 1
  • Keith Prisbey
    • 1
  • Carl Glass
    • 2
  • Lee Barron
    • 3
  1. 1.Keith Prisbrey University of IdahoMoscowUSA
  2. 2.University of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  3. 3.University of IdahoMoscowUSA

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