Emerging Trends in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services

  • Donald P. Oswald
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 18)

Abstract

Child mental health service delivery systems in the United States are in the midst of change. Child advocates have decried the sad state of the service systems and have called for sweeping and fundamental reforms. Mental health professionals and policy makers have endorsed that call and are actively supporting reform initiatives across the country. In this chapter, we describe briefly some of the major historical events in the field of child mental health, summarize the trends emerging from the reform initiatives, and anticipate the direction in which the field is likely to evolve. Before beginning, we note that this chapter will follow the convention of using the terms “child,” “children,” and “youth” to refer to children and adolescents under the age of 18 years.

Keywords

Transportation Assure Beach Expense Resi 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald P. Oswald
    • 1
  • Nirbhay N. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMedical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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