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Particle-Size Considerations for Magnetite-Based Magnetoreceptors

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Magnetite Biomineralization and Magnetoreception in Organisms

Part of the book series: Topics in Geobiology ((TGBI,volume 5))

Abstract

The presence of a magnetic influence upon behavior now appears to be a fairly common trait among a wide variety of organisms, as outlined and discussed elsewhere in this volume. In a broad manner, these behavioral responses can be grouped into two categories, the first of which involves the use of a relatively insensitive “compass” to obtain directional (north/south) information, and a more sensitive system involved in the “map” sense of vertebrates and the time cue of insects.

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© 1985 Plenum Press, New York

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Kirschvink, J.L., Walker, M.M. (1985). Particle-Size Considerations for Magnetite-Based Magnetoreceptors. In: Kirschvink, J.L., Jones, D.S., MacFadden, B.J. (eds) Magnetite Biomineralization and Magnetoreception in Organisms. Topics in Geobiology, vol 5. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-0313-8_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-0313-8_11

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4613-7992-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4613-0313-8

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