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Switching Networks for Generating Random Permutations

Chapter
Part of the Network Theory and Applications book series (NETA, volume 5)

Abstract

Permuting at random is the following problem: given n items on n input positions, choose uniformly at random a permutation π ∈ S n and deliver the items to n output positions so that the ith item is given at output position π(i), for in For the sake of simplicity of notation, we shall assume throughout the paper that the collection of items to be permuted at random is 1,2,…,n.

Keywords

Markov Chain Random Permutation Variation Distance Switching Network Output Position 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Computer ScienceUniversity of WroclawWroclawPoland
  3. 3.Mathematical InstituteWroclaw University of TechnologyWroclawPoland
  4. 4.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceUniversity of PoznańPoznanPoland

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