Clinical Information Interchange with Health Level Seven

  • Stanley M. Huff
  • W. Ed Hammond
  • Warren G. Williams
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

The name Health Level Seven (HL7) refers to both an organization and the set of data exchange standards produced by the organization. Data exchange standards are specifications for the syntax (format) and contents (identifiers, codes, and values) of messages sent between computer systems to meet a particular business need. The purpose of this chapter is to:
  • describe why messaging standards were created

  • provide a brief history of HL7

  • illustrate how the HL7 Standard is used to transmit data between computer systems

  • show examples of how the HL7 Standard can be used to transmit cancer related data and information

Keywords

Digoxin Gentamicin Argentina Cote Berman 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley M. Huff
  • W. Ed Hammond
  • Warren G. Williams

There are no affiliations available

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