Chemical Warfare: A Brief History

  • Eric Croddy
  • Clarisa Perez-Armendariz
  • John Hart

Abstract

We generally think of chemical warfare as a modern phenomenon, but it has its precursors in ancient and medieval warfare, and especially siege warfare. Assaults on castles and walled cities could drag on for months or even years, so it is not surprising that a military commander would look for an innovative way to end a stalemate. Incendiaries and toxic or greasy smokes were common tools in both attacking and defending besieged castles.

Keywords

Arsenic Hydrocarbon Chlorine Cyanide Aniline 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Croddy
  • Clarisa Perez-Armendariz
  • John Hart

There are no affiliations available

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