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Bone Marrow Transplantation Immunology

  • John J. Trentin
  • Rolf Kiessling
  • Hans Wigzell
  • Michael T. Gallagher
  • Surjit K. Datta
  • Sulabha S. Kulkarni
Conference paper
Part of the Experimental Hematology Today book series (HEMATOLOGY, volume 1977)

Abstract

The history of bone marrow transplantation, from the days of Egon Lorenz, has been replete with surprising revelations and important contributions to the fields of immunology and hematology. I well remember the surprise and excitement caused by the discovery that the “secondary irradiation syndrome” or secondary disease of “homologous” irradiation chimeras was not a secondary rejection of the marrow graft, but rather a secondary reaction of the graft versus the host (17, 18, 19). This discovery additionally implied what was not yet then known, namely, that in addition to donor repopulation of the myeloid system, bone marrow transplantation resulted also in functional donor repopulation of the lymphoid system. In those days, although a mere 20 years ago, we did not yet know about the thymic-dependent and -independent portions of the lymphoid system. The role of the thymus in immunity was still to be discovered!

Keywords

Bone Marrow Transplantation Genetic Resistance Bone Marrow Trans Hybrid Mouse Hybrid Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Trentin
  • Rolf Kiessling
  • Hans Wigzell
  • Michael T. Gallagher
  • Surjit K. Datta
  • Sulabha S. Kulkarni

There are no affiliations available

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