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The Effect of Anti-i on Early Myeloid Progenitor Cells in Human Bone Marrow

  • C. J. O’Hara
  • K. H. Shumak
  • G. B. Price
Conference paper
Part of the Experimental Hematology Today book series (HEMATOLOGY, volume 1979)

Abstract

Bone marrow cells incubated for several days in liquid suspension culture with an appropriate stimulator frequently produce more CFU-c than marrow cells assayed without prior incubation. The increase in assayable CFU-c produced by the suspension culture is known as ΔC (2, 11). In the differentiation stage, the cells responsible for ΔC probably fall between CFU-c and the human CFU-s equivalent (2, 8). In support of this hypothesis, it has been shown first that, unlike CFU-c, the ΔC progenitor cells can rarely be detected in the S-phase of the cell cycle (8). Second, two types of stimulatory molecules have been detected in leukocyte-conditioned media. The larger molecules (15,000, 35,000, and 90,000 Daltons) are strong stimulators of human CFU-c but have little or no AC effect (6,9). On the other hand, a class of small molecules (1,200 Daltons) often have a large ΔC effect, but as a class, it is a relatively poor stimulator of CFU-c (6, 12). Third, 4-methyl-hista- mine, which has been shown by Byron (1) to cause murine CFU-s to start DNA synthesis, has been shown to have a similar effect on the human ΔC progenitors, but to have no detectable effect on the cell cycle phase of human CFU-c (8). This evidence suggests that there are significant similarities between the differentiation stage of the human ΔC progenitors and murine CFU-s.

Keywords

Bone Marrow Cell Human Bone Marrow Colony Number Normal Human Serum Bone Marrow Specimen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. J. O’Hara
  • K. H. Shumak
  • G. B. Price

There are no affiliations available

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