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The Normal Parent-Newborn Relationship: Its Importance for the Healthy Development of the Child

  • W. Godfrey Cobliner

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe and critically examine the variables that govern the parent (caretaker)-newborn relationship, to analyze the concepts that are being used to assess its nature, and to explore its impact on the child’s cognitive and emotional developments.

Keywords

Atopic Dermatitis Maternal Care Maternity Ward Maternal Deprivation Maternal Attitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Godfrey Cobliner

There are no affiliations available

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