Diapause Hormones

  • Minoru Isobe
  • Toshio Goto
Part of the Springer Series in Experimental Entomology book series (SSEXP)

Abstract

Diapause in insect development is a result of genetic adaptation to environment during the evolution of a given species. It is defined as a temporary interruption of the development even under the conditions favored at the moment. Diapause is generally associated with a low rate of metabolism and low susceptibility toward dryness, unfavorable temperature (coldness in winter), and respiratory toxins such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide. Resumption of development can only occur after completion of diapause development in a certain period of adverse conditions.

Keywords

Sugar Acetone Proline Carbon Monoxide Lysine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minoru Isobe
  • Toshio Goto

There are no affiliations available

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