The Movement, Persistence, and Fate of the Phenoxy Herbicides and TCDD in the Forest

  • Logan A. Norris
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 80)

Abstract

The phenoxy herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), 2- (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propionic acid (dichlorprop), 2-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propionic acid (silvex), and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are important tools for weed and brush control.1 They have played important roles in the culture of agricultural crops, forest and rangeland management, and a wide variety of noncropland weed control programs.

Keywords

Hydrolysis Chlorinate Leaching Photodecomposition Dibenzofuran 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Logan A. Norris
    • 1
  1. 1.Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment StationUSDA Forest ServiceCorvallisUSA

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