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Cellular Basis of Sodium-Induced Hypertension

  • Mordecai P. Blaustein
  • Stanley Lang
  • Marilyn James-Kracke

Abstract

It is, surely, unnecessary for me to discuss in this forum the alarming prevalence of hypertensive cardiovascular disease in the acculturated societies of the world. It is also unnecessary for me to reemphasize the importance of determining the pathophysiology of the disease (or diseases) so that we can, hopefully, institute appropriate preventive measures.

Keywords

Vascular Smooth Muscle Vascular Tone Peripheral Vascular Resistance Smooth Muscle Tone Smooth Muscle Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mordecai P. Blaustein
  • Stanley Lang
  • Marilyn James-Kracke

There are no affiliations available

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