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The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. Development Policy during the Period of the Third Five-Year Plan, 1966–1970

  • Willy Kraus

Abstract

The third 5-year plan period was only to be started after the reverses suffered by the Chinese economy in the crisis years 1959–1961 had been largely overcome. As is now known, the third 5-year plan which was to comprise the years 1966 to 1970 had only been worked out as a rough outline. Sharp disputes had already broken out during its formulation over basic concept; a compromise solution was probably found shortly before the beginning of the plan period that seemed acceptable to both the protagonists of the strategy of the Great Leap and the advocates of a continuation of the strategy followed up until then.

Keywords

Foreign Trade Plan Period Cultural Revolution Central Committee Chinese Leadership 
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Reference

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    A confirmation that private sideline occupations and deliveries to free markets were permitted was contained in the JMJP of Aug. 20, 1969.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Willy Kraus
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung für Ostasienwissenschaften, Sektion Wirtschaft OstasiensRuhr-University BochumBochum 1Germany

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