Hormonal and Neural Mechanisms Underlying Maternal Behavior in the Rat

  • Susan E. Fahrbach
  • Donald W. Pfaff

Abstract

This chapter will survey current ideas on the physiological bases of maternal behavior in the rat. Maternal behavior is, of course, a characteristic of all mammals, and ethological descriptions of maternal care are on record for many species (Lehrman, 1961; Klopfer, McGeorge, & Barnett, 1973). However, only a few species have been the subjects of laboratory investigations of mother-young interactions. Included among these are the rat, mouse, hamster, gerbil, rabbit, and sheep, with the rat being the best studied in terms of physiological mechanisms. This fact has determined this chapter’s emphasis, but one should not assume that the rat can serve as a general model for the regulation of maternal behavior in mammals. Striking interspecies differences, both in behavior and hormone profiles, have already been described; the significance of these differences is not yet clear.

Keywords

Cholesterol Zinc Catheter Estrogen Lactate 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan E. Fahrbach
  • Donald W. Pfaff

There are no affiliations available

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