The Interpersonal Orientations of Disclosure

  • Richard L. Archer
  • Walter B. Earle
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Why a piece on self-disclosure in a book devoted to group processes? For those who accept the current liberal definition of the term self-disclosure no explanation is necessary. By this definition it is the act of revealing personal information to others, so self-disclosure is inherently social in nature and a part of the traffic among group members. But for those who are purists or simply less familiar with the thrust of the literature the question is a real one. Self-disclosure would obviously appear to refer to the act of reporting one’s self-conception. Viewed from this perspective it is primarily a phenomenon for personality theory, not group dynamics.

Keywords

Assure Posit Stein Triad Arena 

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Reference Note

  1. 1.
    Earle, W. B., Giuliano, A., & Archer, R. L. Lonely at the top: The effect of power and information flow in the dyad. Unpublished manuscript, University of Texas at Austin, 1983.Google Scholar

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Archer
  • Walter B. Earle

There are no affiliations available

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