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Aggressive Behavior of Soccer Players as Social Interaction

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Much has been written about aggression in sports, and seemingly for good reason. If aggressive behavior is conceived of as a kind of behavior that intentionally or unintentionally is directed against a person, or is performed to set other persons at a disadvantage, or even leads to the injuring or hurting of an opponent, sports seems to be a suitable field for the observation of aggressive behavior, and for the empirical investigation of its antecedents and consequences.

Keywords

Aggressive Behavior Soccer Player Impression Management Aggressive Interaction Attribution Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

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